Beloved Child: A Dakota Way of Life

Diane Wilson (Author)
Available

Description

"Far greater even than the loss of land, or the relentless coercion to surrender cultural traditions, the deaths of over six hundred children by the spring of 1864 were an unbearable tragedy. Nearly one hundred and fifty years after the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862, Dakota people are still struggling with the effects of this unimaginable loss."

Among the Dakota, the Beloved Child ceremony marked the special, tender affection that parents felt toward a child whose life had been threatened. In this moving book, author Diane Wilson explores the work of several modern Dakota people who are continuing to raise beloved children: Gabrielle Tateyuskanskan, an artist and poet; Clifford Canku, a spiritual leader and language teacher; Alameda Rocha, a boarding school survivor; Harley and Sue Eagle, Canadian activists; and Delores Brunelle, an Ojibwe counselor. Each of these humble but powerful people teaches children to believe in the "genius and brilliance" of Dakota culture as a way of surviving historical trauma.

Crucial to true healing, Wilson has learned, is a willingness to begin with yourself. Each of these people works to transform the effects of genocide, restoring a way of life that regards our beloved children as wakan, sacred.

Product Details

Price
$17.95  $16.51
Publisher
Minnesota Historical Society Press
Publish Date
September 01, 2017
Pages
224
Dimensions
5.5 X 0.48 X 8.5 inches | 0.59 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781681340746

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About the Author

Diane Wilson, a freelance writer and editor, is the author of Spirit Car: Journey to a Dakota Past.

Reviews

"Beloved Child is not just a very good book, it is a necessary book. The voices translated by Wilson in these stories and dialogues are strong voices not yet heard. This book is therapeutic in the real sense of psychological and emotional healing of historical trauma." First Nations Drum