Bartleby & Co.

Enrique Vila-Matas (Author) Jonathan Dunne (Translator)
Available

Description

In Bartleby & Co., an enormously enjoyable novel, Enrique Vila-Matas tackles the theme of silence in literature: the writers and non-writers who, like the scrivener Bartleby of the Herman Melville story, in answer to any question or demand, replies: "I would prefer not to." Addressing such "artists of refusal" as Robert Walser, Robert Musil, Arthur Rimbaud, Marcel Duchamp, Herman Melville, and J. D. Salinger, Bartleby & Co. could be described as a meditation: a walking tour through the annals of literature. Written as a series of footnotes (a non-work itself), Bartleby embarks on such questions as why do we write, why do we exist? The answer lies in the novel itself: told from the point of view of a hermetic hunchback who has no luck with women, and is himself unable to write, Bartleby is utterly engaging, a work of profound and philosophical beauty.

Product Details

Price
$15.95  $14.67
Publisher
New Directions Publishing Corporation
Publish Date
April 01, 2007
Pages
178
Dimensions
5.28 X 0.54 X 7.99 inches | 0.5 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780811216982
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

ENRIQUE VILA-MATAS was born in Barcelona. He has received countless prizes and written numerous award-winning novels, including Bartleby & Co., Montano's Malady, Never Any End to Paris, and Dublinesque
Jonathan Dunne is a translator of literature and has translated more than fifty books from the Bulgarian, Catalan, Galician and Spanish languages. He has written two earlier books on language and coincidence, The DNA of the English Language (2007) and The Life of a Translator (2013). He lives with his family in Bulgaria, where he converted to Orthodoxy.

Reviews

"Modern Spain's best writer among a growing sect of fanatics scattered around the world: from Estocolmo to Veracruz, from Paris to Cabo Verde, from Lisbon to Prague, from Varsovia to Buenos Aires."