Bald Knobber

Robert Sergel (Author)
Available

Description

Middle-schooler Cole's book report on Bald Knobbers, Reconstruction Era vigilantes, bears an uncanny resonance with his life. Donning a homemade Bald Knobber mask, Cole seeks to right wrongs perpetrated by his divorcing parents, mom's new boyfriend, the school bully and his cat, Daisy. Like the real Bald Knobbers, Cole discovers the consequences of taking the law into your own hands.

Product Details

Price
$15.95  $14.67
Publisher
Secret Acres
Publish Date
October 02, 2018
Pages
80
Dimensions
0.8 X 0.5 X 6.3 inches | 0.45 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780999193518
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Robert Sergel was born in Boston, MA in 1982. He has a degree in Photo & Imaging from NYU's Tisch School of the Arts. In the mid-2000's he was a member of the Transplant web comic collective. He draws the Ignatz-nominated comic series Eschew, a Best American Comics selection. SPACE: An Eschew Collection was published by Secret Acres and counted on Paste Magazine's best comics of the year. Bald Knobber is his first novel length comic. He lives in Cambridge, MA.

Reviews

Sergel's visuals fall in the same school as Nick Drnaso and Chris Ware... ...this focus on details shows where Sergel's attention is going, a method of communicating the subjectivity of experience without spelling it out. Form serves function beautifully. -- Paste Magazine, The 25 Best Comics of 2016 (So Far) Robert Sergel's tableau-like panels and high contrast, precise lines seem perfectly civilized on the surface, while ruthlessly recording the moments of discomfort, humiliation, disquiet, and awkwardness endemic to the human condition. By turns funny, thoughtful, poignant, and humane, his comics are a real delight to the eye, too. -- Rob Kirby, Top 20 Comics List: The 2016 Edition Social scenes take a strong position in Sergel's work giving a sense of life lived and the detached moments that stay with us as a kind of narrative memory of ourselves. Sergel's clear lines and frequent use of solid, dark backgrounds make for a refreshing read and also have an unassuming quality that draws the reader in to participate in the storytelling. Thematically, he also leaves unusual moments of contemplation in the character's life open to interpretation, leaving the door open for big concepts to creep in. -- Comics Beat