Baghdad Burning: Girl Blog from Iraq

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Product Details

Price
$14.95
Publisher
Feminist Press
Publish Date
Pages
304
Dimensions
5.4 X 8.5 X 1.4 inches | 0.65 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781558614895

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About the Author

Riverbend is the pseudonym of a woman who in 2003 began writing a blog relating her first hand experiences of the US invasion and then occupation of her native Iraq. Once a computer programmer in a modern, secular state, Riverbend discusses with honesty and acute political awareness the changes that resulted in the rise of religious fundamentalism.

Reviews

"Anyone who cares about the war in Iraq must read this book." --Susan Sarandon

"Feisty and learned: first-rate reading for any American who suspects that Fox News may not be telling the whole story." --Kirkus Reviews

"Riverbend's commentary [is] passionate, frustrated, sarcastic and sometimes hopeful. . . . It offers quick takes on events as they occur, from a perspective too often overlooked, ignored or suppressed." --Publishers Weekly

"A cross between an underground manifesto and a polished cultural history. . . . With its blend of first-person mouthing off and spirited documentary style, Baghdad Burning offers fair and balanced coverage from inside one of the most rapidly changing--and poorly understood--regions in the world." --Time Out New York

"Her descriptions of normal life in Iraq, adds a dimension to the war coverage that Western journalists have largely missed. Highly recommended to anyone following the conflict." --Library Journal

"Her command of the English language, and her knowledge of the Western world and of her own culture, make this book even more precious. Riverbend's aim is to raise understanding between Iraqis and Americans while she stands up against stereotypes on both sides. I would recommend Baghdad Burning." --MultiCultural Review