Avoiding Dangerous Climate Change

Hans Joachim Schellnhuber (Editor) Wolfgang Cramer (Editor)
& 1 more
Available

Description

The impacts of climate change are already being observed in a variety of sectors and there is greater clarity that these changes are being caused by human activities, mainly through release of greenhouse gases. In 2005 the UK Government hosted the Avoiding Dangerous Climate Change conference to take an in-depth look at the scientific issues associated with climate change. This volume presents findings from the leading international scientists that attended the conference. The topics addressed include critical thresholds and key vulnerabilities of the climate system, impacts on human and natural systems, socioeconomic costs and benefits of emissions pathways, and technological options for meeting different stabilisation levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The volume provides invaluable information for researchers in environmental science, climatology, and atmospheric chemistry, policy-makers in governments and environmental organizations, and scientists and engineers in industry.

Product Details

Price
$146.95
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Publish Date
February 01, 2006
Pages
392
Dimensions
8.8 X 1.1 X 11.2 inches | 2.7 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780521864718

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About the Author

Hans Joachim Schellnhuber is Professor of Theoretical Physics at Potsdam University and Director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). He is also Chair of the German Advisory Council on Global Change and was appointed Chief Government Advisor on Climate and Related Issues during Germany's G8 and EU presidencies in 2007. From 2001-5 he was Research Director of the British Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research. He is an elected member of, inter alia, the German National Academy (Leopoldina) and the US National Academy of Sciences. In 2004 he was awarded a CBE by Queen Elizabeth II, and in 2007 received the German Environment Prize.