Astragal

(Author) (Translator)
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Product Details

Price
$15.95
Publisher
New Directions Publishing Corporation
Publish Date
Pages
190
Dimensions
5.3 X 0.7 X 8.1 inches | 0.5 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780811220736
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Albertine Sarrazin (1937-1967) was a French-Algerian writer. At an early age she abandoned her studies and turned to a life of crime and prostitution. She wrote her first two novels in prison and died at twenty-nine.
Patsy Southgate (1928-1998) was an integral figure of both the 1950s Parisian literary scene and the New York School.
Patti Smith is a writer, performer, and visual artist. She gained recognition in the 1970s for her revolutionary mergence of poetry and rock and was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2007. Her seminal album Horses, bearing Robert Mapplethorpe's renowned photograph, hasbeen hailed as one of the top one hundred albums of all time. Her books include M Train, Witt, Babel, Woolgathering, The Coral Sea, and Auguries of Innocence.

Reviews

Sarrazin's career may have been tragically curtailed, but her legacy is a novel that grateful readers are discovering now, almost 50 years after her death.
The story -- drawn from Sarrazin's own life -- of Anne's escape from prison, subsequent incapacitating ankle break (the book is named for the bone she snaps), and arduous recovery, is so alive with Anne's voice that reading it, one wants simply to remain in her presence, to sit by her bedside as she squirms, frustrated, towards recovery. Anne makes good company.
The prose is hard-boiled, funny, sometimes gross, oscillating between indolence and intensity, riddled with ellipses and exclamation points. It is wayward, hard to pin down; it can't be forced to behave. There are associative leaps, synesthetic flights, and characters introduced without preamble or identification. Sarrazin brooked no exposition, no laborious knitting of circumstance to circumstance. One might call her style stream-of-consciousness, but that modernist term fails to account for the impression of Pop hyperreality that communicates itself through her steady drumbeat of allusions.