Asian Power and Politics: The Cultural Dimensions of Authority

Available

Product Details

Price
$54.00
Publisher
Belknap Press
Publish Date
Pages
430
Dimensions
6.0 X 9.16 X 1.06 inches | 0.01 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780674049796

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About the Author

Lucian W. Pye was Ford Professor of Political Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and author of Mao Tse-Tung: The Man in the Leader.

Reviews

Absorbing reading. It is written with a flair and dash that carries one along. Reading it is like following the figures in a richly textured tapestry. Pye's mastery of this variety of complex cultures is impressive. It rings with authenticity.--Gabriel A. Almond, Stanford University
An extremely lucid, informative, and valuable work that meets a long-standing need for a readable and comprehensive view of the methods and cultural foundations of exercising power and authority in Asia.--Choice
[A] rich and stimulating analysis which will be the subject of much scholarly debate.--Foreign Affairs
Pye's thesis is that as social psychology cannot be properly understood unless it is embodied in a context of individual psychology, so the phenomenon of power cannot be understood without reference to the cultural context within which it exists. Pye contends that those political scientists who study the nature of power have erred in treating it as a universal concept... Central to Pye's thesis is his contrasting of the Western concept of individual autonomy with the Eastern concept of dependency on an idealized, benevolent, authoritarian leadership. Closely reasoned and brilliantly argued, this is a superb contribution to the international political debate.--Kirkus Reviews
A broadly gauged analysis of contemporary Asian politics. This study is a fascinating mix of in-depth data and basic theses, both intra-culture and cross-cultural in nature. It will provide the basis for stimulating discussion and further research.--Robert A. Scalapino, Robson Research Professor of Government, University of California, Berkeley
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