Art of Katahdin

David Little (Author)
Available

Description

Katahdin has been called Maine's greatest treasure. In addition to the outdoor and sporting tradition that surrounds it, there is a distinct tradition of art. For more than a hundred years, some of the most prominent landscape painters--Marsden Hartley, Frederic Church, John Marin, and many others--have portrayed Katahdin. Art of Katahdin is the first book to catalog this tradition. Filled with hundreds of color artworks this books traces the artists who have worked at Katahdin, from the earliest renderings and maps of the area to contemporary views. The text follows some of the history of the region, as well as the artists' ties to the mountain.

Product Details

Price: $50.00
Publisher: Down East Books
Published Date: May 16, 2013
Pages: 200
Dimensions: 11.95 X 0.96 X 10.21 inches | 3.54 pounds
ISBN: 9781608930050

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About the Author

David Little, a resident of Portland, Maine, has been painting the Maine landscape since 1983, and has always been drawn to rugged Katahdin wilderness. He attended the Skowhegan School in 1981 and 1982, and was a recipient of the Carina House fellowship on Monhegan in 1998. Little is represented by Courthouse Gallery Fine Art in Ellsworth and by Thomas Moser Cabinetmakers in Freeport. His work has been included in exhibitions at the Blaine House, Bates College Museum of Art, and the Farnsworth Museum. Little's experience in the art world is broad--he spent ten years working at the Bayview Gallery in Portland, and he gives critiques, juries art shows, and curates. This is his first book.

Reviews

David Little's expertise is obvious.--Portland Press Herald
Little, a Maine artist who has climbed and painted Katahdin for decades, remains in its thrall. Presenting 200 images created over the past 200 years, his book is a colorful study of the artists driven to capture the rugged mountain. This is history at its finest: first-person accounts of wilderness expeditions illustrated with changing views of the mountain, depicted in dozens of paintings and illustrations.--Boston Globe