Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Seasons of Life and Land

Subhankar Banerjee (Author) Jimmy Carter (Foreword by)
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Product Details

Price
$39.95
Publisher
Mountaineers Books
Publish Date
April 02, 2003
Pages
176
Dimensions
11.38 X 0.85 X 11.3 inches | 3.24 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780898869095
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Indian-born artist-educator-activist SUBHANKAR BANERJEE uses photography to raise awareness of issues that threaten the health and well being of our planet. Since late 2000, he has focused his efforts on indigenous human rights and land conservation issues in the Arctic.

Born in India in 1967, Banerjee received his bachelorâ (TM)s degree in engineering before moving to the United States, where he obtained masterâ (TM)s degrees in physics and computer science. Before starting his career in photography, Banerjee worked in scientific fields for six years, with Los Alamos National Lab in New Mexico and Boeing in Seattle. His first professional photographic project culminated in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Seasons of Life and Land. Solo exhibits of Banerjeeâ (TM)s Arctic Refuge photographs have been on display in over forty individual and group exhibits in the United States and Europe, and published in over one hundred magazines and newspapers internationally. He has lectured extensively to educate the public about land conservation, resource wars, and cultural diversity issues. He collaborates with Art for the Environment, an educational outreach initiative of the United Nations Environment Programme and the Natural World Museum. He has received many awards for his Arctic work including an inaugural Greenleaf Artist Award from the United Nations Environment Programme and a Cultural Freedom Fellowship from Lannan Foundation. Since 2006, Banerjee has been a visiting scholar in the College of Environmental Humanities at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City. He will also be the Artist-in-Residence at Dartmouth College during the winter 2009 quarter. He serves on the advisory board of Blue Earth Alliance. Banerjee and his wife Nora live in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

For more information on the artist and his upcoming exhibits and events, visit www.subhankarbanerjee.org.

Jimmy Carter was the thirty-ninth President of the United States, serving from 1977 to 1981. In 1982, he and his wife founded The Carter Center, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of people around the world. Carter was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2002. He is the author of thirty books, including A Full Life: Reflections at Ninety; A Call to Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power; An Hour Before Daylight: Memoirs of a Rural Boyhood; and Our Endangered Values: America's Moral Crisis.

Reviews

Amazingly, it has taken a native of Calcutta, India, to bring home to the American people the jewel in our crown. And he has done a superb job. This book should be required reading of every senator, congressman, and president.--The Explorers Journal
Banerjee's book will either be a historical record of how the refuge once looked, or a vital part of the chain of events that saved the refuge for future generations to enjoy.--The Oregonian
Banerjee...has done a masterful job of showing that the refuge is-year round-a rare and precious ecosystem, teeming with life that exists in a fine balance of nature.--Winston-Salem (NC) Journal
It's hard to believe that this beautifully exceuted, passionate book about a nature preserve north of the Arctic Circle that is home to thousands of migrating caribou could well be a significant ecological publication. ... From a double rainbow arching over the taiga... to a rare red aurora borealis... this book is an eye-opening treasure.--New York Newsday
[The photographs] defy the administration's argument...that drilling would not disrupt the refuge because for most of the year it is an area of 'flat, white nothingness. In the tradition of landscape photographers Ansel Adams and Eliot Porter, Banerjee's images of a densely feathered American dipper flitting in a pool of icy water, of the bleached bones of whales reaching out from a snow-covered cemetery, of a sky painted lipstick red by the Northern Lights, tell otherwise.--Los Angeles Times
Through his photos, Banerjee memorializes a unique landscape of great scale...Roland Barthes described photographs as images that can only happen once, imploring us to look at a moment captured in time. ANWR, rendered so magisterially in Seasons of Life and Land, demands that we look now. If this great wilderness goes the way of the Everglades, the photographic record will be one of shame.--Wildlife Conservation
What a grand and timely achievement. Banerjee has influenced the course of a political battle over whether to open the refuge to oil drilling. Essays by Peter Matthiessen and David Allen Sibley, among others, and a forward by Jimmy Carter, add depth and force. The talented people at The Mountaineers Books have produced an elegant, intriguing book with spectacular color photographs.--Audubon Naturalist News
It's a spectacular tour of endangered wildlife, tremendous terrain, otherworldly skyscapes, and isolated Inuit villages. And it is arguably the most comprehensive -- and potentially politically influential -- visual chronicle of the Refuge to date.--National Geographic Adventure
[Banerjee's] lush images of glaciers, polar bears, caribou, and lichens remind us how fragile these lands really are.--Discover
Seasons of Life and Land will surely become a classic of American environmental consciousness. It is impeccably researched, intelligently conceived, astonishingly observant and radiant with love for its subject.--London Times Higher Education Supplement
This book contains gorgeous close-ups of wildflowers and spectacular panoramas of wilderness as far as the eye can see. There are breathtaking aerial shots of mountains, rivers and migratory routes-and there are gut-wrenching photos of the industrial sprawl at neighboring Prudhoe Bay....Seasons of Life and Land deserves a large and receptive readership.--The Olympian
[Banerjee's] exquisite photos allow the voices of plants, animals and indigenous people to be heard, and make it impossible to consider this land as a barren expanse.--E, The Environmental Magazine
[Banerjee's] pictures of birds, bears, and sun-struck mountains of ice are beautiful, but what makes this book so valuable are the essays by nature writers, including Peter Matthiessen and George Schaller.--St. Paul Pioneer Press, also ran in syndication
The scope of Banerjee's work is truly breathtaking.--Trail & Timberline
The spectacular 120 photographs have the power to transport the viewer into the extraordinary beauty of this 'sacred place where all life begins'.--Outdoors West
Seasons of Life and Land serves as both a record of stunning, wild places and a reminder of just how much can be lost so quickly should even small amounts of oil resources be extracted.--Dandelion
Sometimes pictures have a chance to change history by creating a larger understanding of a subject, thus enlightening the public and bringing greater awareness to an issue. The book, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Seasons of Life and Land, should offer those who see the Arctic refuge as a barren wasteland a chance to have second thoughts--Planet Jackson Hole
[Banerjee's] startling beautiful pictures reveal the beauty of the people and frozen landscape. Just reading the book brings a chill even on a blistering hot day.--Knoxville (TN) News-Sentinel
When you see Banerjee's most memorable pictures, it's not hardship that's evident but beauty. A non-formulaic beauty. Banerjee doesn't try to get perfect 'Hallmark' scenes. While he did shoot the most spectacular, neon-like image that I have ever seen, he isn't one to milk sunsets. Instead he shows the beauty of ordinary scenes and the passing of the seasons. He isn't afraid of what others might see as 'a mess.' He finds the grace in tangled-up branches and unruly weeds...Banerjee's landscapes seem epic, and there is something about them that is haunting.--Vanity Fair