Animals and Psychedelics: The Natural World and the Instinct to Alter Consciousness (Original)

Available

Product Details

Price
$12.95  $11.91
Publisher
Park Street Press
Publish Date
Pages
112
Dimensions
5.44 X 0.35 X 8.22 inches | 0.32 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780892819867
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Ethnobotanist and ethnomycologist Giorgio Samorini has studied the use of psychoactive substances for more than twenty years, conducting research in Africa, Latin America, India, and Europe. He is editor-in-chief of the scientific journal Eleusis, Plants and Psychoactive Compounds. He lives in Italy.

Reviews

"Giorgio Samorini's text is a beautiful little object. Not only is the information that it contains fascinating, but also pitched at a level that is very engaging and thought-provoking. The question of intentionality and the natural inclination toward intoxication is neatly crafted together and explored, and gives the impression that this field of study is well worth further investigation by researchers."--Psychedelic Press UK, January 2013
"Samorini's observations support his controversial hypothesis that human drug-taking derives from a universal biologically-based drive to alter consciousness. This perspective on drug-taking behavior can only enlarge our own views about the phenomenon which, in many humans, has become so contentious."--Rick Strassman, author of DMT: The Spirit Molecule and Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry, U
"Samorini offers support for not only the theory of a biological basis of the pursuit of altered states, but also the possibility that this activity may expand the behavioral repertoire, thus altering evolution. Provocative reading."--Julie Holland, MD, Editor, Ecstasy: The Complete Guide Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, B
"This must be one of the most important books about animals - or drugs - that you are likely to read."--Mark Pilkington, Fortean Times, December 2002