Alex Webb: The Suffering of Light

(Text by (Art/Photo Books)) (Photographer)
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Product Details

Price
$65.00  $59.80
Publisher
Aperture
Publish Date
Pages
204
Dimensions
13.25 X 12.25 X 0.9 inches | 4.8 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781597111737

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About the Author

Geoff Dyer is the author of Jeff in Venice, Death in Varanasi, among other novels, and several nonfiction books, including Out of Sheer Rage. He won a National Book Critics Circle Award in 2012 for Otherwise Known as the Human Condition. He lives in Los Angeles.
Alex Webb was born in San Francisco in 1952. His photographs have been featured in The New York Times Magazine, Life, Stern, and National Geographic and exhibited at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and the International Center of Photography and Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. He is a recipient of the Leica Medal of Excellence (2000) and a member of Magnum Photos.

Reviews

The images - rich in color and visual rhythm - span 30 years and several continents. Of course, Haiti and the Mexican border are well represented, locales that opened up a new way to see.He has been able to render Haiti - a place often depicted for its chaos - with a precise eye, finding personal moments that are as still as they are complex. He can use shadows as skillfully as a be-bop musician to set the tempo. The people in his frames can look like dwarfs being stomped on by giant, disembodied feet. He can make an American street seem far more foreboding than any Third World slum.--David Gonzalez"The New York Times" (12/18/2011)
A 30-year retrospective of a great, and often overlooked, American pioneer of colour photography who pays scant regard to genre boundaries, merging art photography, photojournalism and often complex street photographs.--Sean O'Hagan "The Guardian "
In far-flung corners of the globe, Webb captures glimpses of beauty in impoverished lives and stoicism in the face of strife.--Jack Crager "American Photo "
The images -- rich in color and visual rhythm -- span 30 years and several continents. Of course, Haiti and the Mexican border are well represented, locales that opened up a new way to see.
He has been able to render Haiti -- a place often depicted for its chaos -- with a precise eye, finding personal moments that are as still as they are complex. He can use shadows as skillfully as a be-bop musician to set the tempo. The people in his frames can look like dwarfs being stomped on by giant, disembodied feet. He can make an American street seem far more foreboding than any Third World slum.--David Gonzalez "The New York Times "