Advice for Future Corpses (and Those Who Love Them): A Practical Perspective on Death and Dying

Sallie Tisdale (Author)
Available

Description

A NEW YORK TIMES BOOK CRITICS' TOP 10 BOOK OF THE YEAR

"In its loving, fierce specificity, this book on how to die is also a blessedly saccharine-free guide for how to live" (The New York Times).

Former NEA fello

Product Details

Price
$16.00  $14.72
Publisher
Gallery Books
Publish Date
June 18, 2019
Pages
256
Dimensions
5.4 X 0.7 X 8.3 inches | 0.45 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781501182181
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

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GROUNDBREAKING. A career-defining book. -The New Yorker

Sallie Tisdale is the author of seven books on such varied subjects as medical technology, her pioneer ancestors, and Buddhist women teachers. Her many essays have appeared in Harper's, Conjunctions, The New Yorker, Antioch Review, The Threepenny Review, and many other journals. This first collection of work spans 30 years and includes an introduction and brief epilogues to each essay. Tisdale's questing curiosity pursues subjects from the biology of flies to the experience of working in an abortion clinic, why it is so difficult to play sports with men, and whether it's possible for writers to tell the truth. She restlessly returns to themes of the body, the family, and how we try to explain ourselves to each other. She is unwilling to settle for easy answers, and she finds the ambiguity and wonder underneath ordinary events. The collection includes a recent essay never before published, about the mystery of how we present

Reviews

"In its loving, fierce specificity, this book on how to die is also a blessedly saccharine-free guide for how to live. . . . Tisdale does not write to allay anxieties but to acknowledge them, and she brings death so close, in such detail and with such directness, that something unusual happens, something that feels a bit taboo. She invites not just awe or dread--but our curiosity. And why not? We are, after all, just 'future corpses pretending we don't know.'"
--New York Times
"Tisdale (Violation: Collected Essays), a former nurse, offers an intimate insider's look at dying, aimed at both caregivers and mortally ill people. By turns philosophical and pragmatic, Tisdale gently prods readers to make plans while they can ... Tisdale's forthright narrative voice, charmingly bossy in style ("Be very careful about odors.... You don't want to be the most nauseating thing that happens in the day"), is so generous and kind in spirit that readers will gladly follow along."
--Publishers Weekly
"Sallie Tisdale's elegantly understated new book pretends to be a user's guide when in fact it's a profound meditation. It also pretends to be about how to die. Actually, it's about how to live."
--David Shields, author of Reality Hunger
"Reading the book is like having a nice, long chat with an unsqueamish friend. . . Tisdale writes warmly, sharing what she knows with a natural gift."
--Portland Tribune
"Sallie Tisdale is the real thing, a writer who thinks like a philosopher, observes like a journalist, and sings on the page like a poet"
--Meghan Daum, author of The Unspeakable
"I read Sallie Tisdale and within a few seconds I am under her spell. It matters not whether she's writing about the tyranny of weight loss, the startling lives of blowflies, or what it's like to work in an oncology ward (she is a dedicated nurse as well as a brilliant writer), I'm all in, all the time. I will go anywhere she wants to take me. An alternate image--climbing into a submarine with Tisdale at the controls and diving down down down, into her singular sensibility, her genius for language, her love of our deeply imperfect world."
--Karen Karbo, author of Julia Child Rules: Lessons on Savoring Life
"Sallie Tisdale takes subjects that might seem mundane or overdone and renders them unforgettable"
--San Francisco Examiner