Activist New York: A History of People, Protest, and Politics

(Author) (Foreword by)
Available

Product Details

Price
$40.00
Publisher
New York University Press
Publish Date
Pages
304
Dimensions
8.4 X 10.3 X 1.0 inches | 2.85 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781479804603

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About the Author

Steven H. Jaffe is a curator at the Museum of the City of New York. He is the author of New York at War: Four Centuries of Combat, Fear, and Intrigue in Gotham (2012) and Who Were the Founding Fathers? Two Hundred Years of Reinventing Ameriacn History (1996). He is the co-author of Envisioning Brooklyn: Family, Philanthropy, and the Growth of an American City (with Rebecca Amato, 2017), and Capital of Capital: Money, Banking, and Power in New York City (with Jessica Lautin, 2014).
Eric Foner is the DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University. He is the Pulitzer Prize winning author of the New York Times bestseller Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad (2016).

Reviews

"Steven H.Jaffe incontrovertibly establishes New York as 'the capital city of social activism' by recounting a litany of provocative flash points, including the Flushing Remonstrance, the Zenger trial, the Stamp Act, slavery, immigration, slums, pay and safety standards for factory workers, womens suffrage, the Red Scare, Prohibition, the Cold War, school integration, civil rights, nuclear disarmament, feminism, gay rights, Occupy Wall Street and racial profiling by law enforcement."--The New York Times
"Black Performance on the Outskirts of the Leftprovides an impressive account of embodied tactics, affects, and experiments that launched provisional challenges to hegemonic systems of order and charted energetic paths for future radical acts to followGaines supplies black performance studies with an expansive and heterogeneous approach to the history of radicalism, to performance, and to blackness itself."--TDR: The Drama Review