Abortion in Early Modern Italy

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Product Details

Price
$61.20
Publisher
Harvard University Press
Publish Date
Pages
368
Dimensions
6.1 X 9.3 X 1.4 inches | 1.63 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780674248090

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About the Author

John Christopoulos is Assistant Professor of History at the University of British Columbia.

Reviews

A major contribution--subtle, erudite, and wide-ranging. Christopoulos's sophisticated handling of the complexities and ambiguities surrounding the termination of pregnancy in early modern Italy makes this book not merely for scholars interested in abortion but also for anyone who studies the workings of early modern society more generally. Abortion in Early Modern Italy demonstrates the abilities of a first-rate historian.--Mary Lindemann, University of Miami
While most studies of the early history of abortion adopt the perspective of medical, ecclesiastical, and secular authorities, this important book gives equal attention to the motivations and experiences of the women and men involved in procuring, facilitating, or testifying regarding abortions. Through exhaustive archival research, Christopoulos has managed to excavate the voices not only of the pregnant women themselves, but also of their accusers, their partners, rapists, and seducers, their families, their healers, and other members of the community.--Katharine Park, Harvard University
In this beautifully researched book, punctuated by vivid microhistories, John Christopoulos offers a complex and nuanced perspective on the meaning of abortion in early modern Italy. He puts a human face on the decisions made by men and especially women, by church and state, and by judges, lawyers, and medical experts, allowing us to see how this quintessential Catholic society grappled with the status of the unborn and reproductive rights. Christopoulos thoughtfully reminds us that the past is full of surprises, sometimes where we least expect them.--Paula Findlen, Stanford University