A Thousand Pieces of Paradise: Landscape and Property in the Kickapoo Valley

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Product Details

Price
$24.95
Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Publish Date
Pages
248
Dimensions
5.9 X 8.9 X 0.8 inches | 0.01 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780299213947

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About the Author

Lynne Heasley is assistant professor of history and environmental studies at Western Michigan University..

Reviews

"This penetrating analysis of the complex forces that shape the landscape is a welcome relief from the narrow, rancorous debate between private property rights and outside government interference."--Brian Donahue, author of Reclaiming the Commons: Community Farms and Forests in a New England Town


"An insightful, engaging, and highly readable treatment of a complex set of themes . . . the lessons learned are applicable throughout rural America."--Harvey Jacobs, editor of Who Owns America: Social Conflict Over Property Rights


"Although this is a superb study of how the land itself is changing, it is even better as a series of interwoven human stories."--Richarad Francaviglia, American Historical Review


"Extensively researched and carefully documented, A Thousand Pieces of Paradise is thoroughly accessible to lay readers and scholars alike, and searches past history of Kickapoo Valley's rural ecosystems in hope of offering accurate future predictions of and solutions to future problems for Kickapoo Valley and other lands like it."--Midwest Book Review


"A splendid job. The book provides great insights into what is happening in these rural counties. I would urge any planner with an interest in rural planning to read the book before embarking on a career . . . in such regions."--Harold (Bud) C. Jordahl, Jr., co-founder of the first Earth Day and leader in establishing the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore


An insightful, engaging, and highly readable treatment of a complex set of themes. While the story told focuses on southwestern Wisconsin, the lessons learned are applicable throughout rural America.--Harvey Jacobs, editor of Who Owns America: Social Conflict Over Property Rights