A Storm Blew in from Paradise

Johannes Anyuru (Author) Rachel Wilson-Broyles (Translator)
Available

Description

"Hypnotic...a sophisticated meditation on politics, race and ethnicity. (...) Anyuru's prose is incandescent." --Peter Kimani, The New York Times Book Review
"An extraordinary life in exile inspires a multilayered novel. (...) A deeply moving meditation on identity and history, the personal and the political, blurring the boundaries between truth and fiction." --Kirkus Review

P's greatest dream is to fly. He sets out to become a Ugandan fighter pilot, training in an academy in Greece. When the 1971 Idi Amin coup in his homeland disrupts his plans, he defects and becomes a man on the run. In this extraordinary novel based on his own father's fate, Anyuru evokes P's struggles in gorgeous, vivid prose. As a refugee, military-camp prisoner, and exile, P never gives up hope and continues to dream of life as a pilot. In a story told across two generations, P searches for identity and purpose in a world in which nowhere is home.

Product Details

Price: $16.98  $15.62
Publisher: World Editions
Published Date: November 05, 2019
Pages: 252
Dimensions: 5.5 X 1.1 X 8.4 inches | 0.75 pounds
ISBN: 9781642860443
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Johannes Anyuru (Sweden, 1979), the son of a Ugandan father and a Swedish mother, is a novelist and poet. A Storm Blew in from Paradise enjoyed immense success in Sweden and was awarded two major Swedish literature prizes: the Svenska Dagbladet Literature Prize and the Aftonbladet Literature Prize.

Reviews

"In January 1971, Uganda's president, Milton Obote, was deposed by his army commander, Idi Amin, (...) followed by a reign of terror. (...) In his hypnotic semiautobiographical novel, Johannes Anyuru, born in Sweden in 1979 to a Ugandan father and a Swedish mother, peels back these layers of turmoil, revealing how Amin's rise to power altered his father's life and provided a prologue for his own. (...)Anyuru's prose is incandescent, effortlessly navigating the turbulence in his hero's life. The story frame is tight, focusing on a few months of P's incarceration and his subsequent exile, but it opens out into a sophisticated meditation on politics, race and ethnicity." --Peter Kimani, The New York Times Book Review

"A deeply moving meditation on identity and history, the personal and the political, blurring the boundaries between truth and fiction." --Kirkus Reviews

"While a resilient human can be broken, resilience itself can't....a lesson that comes across clearly in Anyuru's effective debut novel." --Rain Taxi

"Johannes Anyuru tenderly and poetically paints a masterful portrait of his father, of a voyage, of a quest, and of a life trapped by history. A sometimes terrible and unforgettable destiny which resounds like a cry of hope in the greatest hopelessness. A dangerous but life-saving voyage--be it simply to serve as reminder never again to be forgotten to lift our eyes to the heavens." --Actes Sud

"A strikingly beautiful text pierced with today's doubts and theories about what creates true meaning in the life story of a single human being, as well as in history. This is a personal and universal novel about fatherlessness and identity, about the power of violence and about how we are all prisoners of time." --Aftonbladet

"Johannes Anyuru's language hurls itself, like the main character of this book, straight into the sun, burning and scorching." --Helsingborgs Dagblad

"You feel the breeze from the storm out of paradise, you feel the large movements, you feel the hypnotic effect of a prose that can make you visualize the Angel of History zooming in on a building in Växjö. It is fantastic." --Expressen

"Anyuru's searingly poetic style rescues his writing from bleakness and sentimentality alike as he confronts the lies we live by." --The Independent

"A tense, sparse re-telling of a life. This novel is a shining example of literature's ability to give its readers a new perspective on the world, and an excellent way to learn about the emotional consequences of war and exile. I can honestly say that A Storm Blew in from Paradise is the best Swedish novel I have read in a long time. I would advise anyone interested in the writing process, in familial and national ties, in pain, healing, loss and rediscovery to read it." --Swedish Book Review

"A Storm Blew in from Paradise touchingly portrays the drama, absurdity, and insignificance of life as a political refugee." --MO Magazine