A Series of Small Maneuvers

Eliot Treichel (Author)
Available

Description

For 15-year-old Emma Wilson, everything is changing. Uncomfortable at home and in school, Emma's growing up, and feels isolated from her friends and family. Things go from bad to unfathomably worse when Emma inadvertently causes an accident that kills her increasingly distant father on a spring break canoe trip meant to bring them closer together.

Suddenly, Emma's efforts to reconcile with her father as a parent and a person have to happen without him, and she must confront her guilt and her grief to begin moving forward. With the help of river rats, ranch hands, and her horse, Magic, Emma finds strength in herself as she and her family navigate their reentry into "normal" life.

Product Details

Price
$14.95  $13.75
Publisher
Ooligan Press
Publish Date
November 01, 2015
Pages
300
Dimensions
5.5 X 0.5 X 8.4 inches | 0.7 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781932010794

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

Eliot Treichel is a native of Wisconsin who now lives in Eugene, Oregon. His first book, Close Is Fine, is the winner of the Wisconsin Library Association Literary Award. His fiction and creative nonfiction have appeared in Beloit Fiction Journal, CutBank, Passages North, Southern Indiana Review, and Hawai'i Pacific Review. He's also written for Canoe & Kayak, Paddler, and Eugene Magazine. For more information, visit his website at www.eliottreichel.com.

Reviews

After her father s death, stemming from an accident while exploring the remote Rio Tinto in New Mexico, 15-year-old Emma Wilson travels alone through rapids and dangerous temperatures to safety. But even at home with her grieving mother and younger sister, Emma cannot find peace after an incident she takes responsibility for ( Please don t ever tell me that accidents just happen ), no matter what her family and the police say. Treichel (Close Is Fine) switches between Emma s past and present, recounting her memories of an emotional and contradictory father on the verge of divorce, her time on the river, and her difficult readjustment to school and friends, all while focusing on language that underlines the beauty of the natural world instilled in Emma by her father ( The early morning light was the color of ripe peaches ). While technical descriptions of canoeing and camping may stymie outdoor novices, Treichel s realistic and compelling characterization of Emma highlights a maturity into adulthood that offers no easy solutions to the difficulties of grief, but celebrates the best of her family. Ages 12 up."

Treichel s realistic and compelling characterization of Emma highlights a maturity into adulthood that offers no easy solutions to the difficulties of grief, but celebrates the best of her family."

I'd go so far as to say it's one of the best books I've read this year, in any genre.--Melanie Bishop

After her father s death, stemming from an accident while exploring the remote Rio Tinto in New Mexico, 15-year-old Emma Wilson travels alone through rapids and dangerous temperatures to safety. But even at home with her grieving mother and younger sister, Emma cannot find peace after an incident she takes responsibility for ( Please don t ever tell me that accidents just happen ), no matter what her family and the police say. Treichel (Close Is Fine) switches between Emma s past and present, recounting her memories of an emotional and contradictory father on the verge of divorce, her time on the river, and her difficult readjustment to school and friends, all while focusing on language that underlines the beauty of the natural world instilled in Emma by her father ( The early morning light was the color of ripe peaches ). While technical descriptions of canoeing and camping may stymie outdoor novices, Treichel s realistic and compelling characterization of Emma highlights a maturity into adulthood that offers no easy solutions to the difficulties of grief, but celebrates the best of her family. Ages 12 up.

"

I'd go so far as to say it's one of the best books I've read this year, in any genre.

--Melanie Bishop

Treichel s realistic and compelling characterization of Emma highlights a maturity into adulthood that offers no easy solutions to the difficulties of grief, but celebrates the best of her family.

"
Winner of the 2017 Oregon Book Awards Reader's Choice Award

After her father's death, stemming from an accident while exploring the remote Rio Tinto in New Mexico, 15-year-old Emma Wilson travels alone through rapids and dangerous temperatures to safety. But even at home with her grieving mother and younger sister, Emma cannot find peace after an incident she takes responsibility for ("Please don't ever tell me that accidents just happen"), no matter what her family and the police say. Treichel (Close Is Fine) switches between Emma's past and present, recounting her memories of an emotional and contradictory father on the verge of divorce, her time on the river, and her difficult readjustment to school and friends, all while focusing on language that underlines the beauty of the natural world instilled in Emma by her father ("The early morning light was the color of ripe peaches"). While technical descriptions of canoeing and camping may stymie outdoor novices, Treichel's realistic and compelling characterization of Emma highlights a maturity into adulthood that offers no easy solutions to the difficulties of grief, but celebrates the best of her family. Ages 12-up.


Treichel's realistic and compelling characterization of Emma highlights a maturity into adulthood that offers no easy solutions to the difficulties of grief, but celebrates the best of her family.


Winner of the 2017 Oregon Book Awards Readers' Choice Award