A Return to Modesty: Discovering the Lost Virtue

Wendy Shalit (Author)
Available

Description

Revised and updated, this fifteenth anniversary edition of A Return to Modesty reignites Wendy Shalit's controversial claim that we have lost our respect for an essential virtue: modesty.

When A Return to Modesty was first published in 1999, its argument launched a worldwide discussion about the possibility of innocence and romantic idealism. Wendy Shalit was the first to systematically critique the "hook-up" scene and outline the harms of making sexuality so public.

Today, with social media increasingly blurring the line between public and private life, and with child exploitation on the rise, the concept of modesty is more relevant than ever. Updated with a new preface that addresses the unique problems facing society now, A Return to Modesty shows why "the lost virtue" of modesty is not a hang-up that we should set out to cure, but rather a wonderful instinct to be celebrated.

A Return to Modesty is a deeply personal account as well as a fascinating intellectual exploration into everything from seventeenth-century manners to the 1948 tune "Baby, It's Cold Outside." Beholden neither to social conservatives nor to feminists, Shalit reminds us that modesty is not prudery, but a natural instinct--and one that may be able to save us from ourselves.

Product Details

Price
$17.00
Publisher
Free Press
Publish Date
May 20, 2014
Pages
326
Dimensions
5.4 X 1.0 X 8.3 inches | 0.65 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781476756653
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Wendy Shalit began to write A Return to Modesty as an undergrad at Williams College, where she received her BA in philosophy. She is also the author of The Good Girl Revolution and her essays on literary and cultural topics have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and other publications. Now that she is the mother of three lively and opinionated children, she is more modest and humbled than ever before.

Reviews

"Her book has touched a nerve in a society overdosed on sex...Shalit defends...compellingly, shame, privacy, gallantry, and sexual reticence"--Tamala M. Edwards "Time "
"Ms. Shalit marshals impressive evidence from philosophers as well as the tabloids to make her case for a return to modesty -- as both a sexual ideal and a strategy for greater pleasure...[a] serious yet bouncy study"--Ruth R. Wisse "The Wall Street Journal "
"The book of the moment...makes a compelling case for the idea that the sexual revolution hasn't been entirely good for either women or men...Social workers, health professionals and others who bemoan the loss of "boundaries" in the lives of troubled girls will find a hopeful message in the book"--Shari Roan "Los Angeles Times "
"The first book of its kind...to blaze down the center of the postfeminist battleground between left and right."--Norah Vincent "Salon "
"[An] earnest and serious book....A fascinating subject [brought] to our attention in a fresh way."--Suzanne Field "The Washington Times "
"Wendy Shalit's first book, A Return to Modesty. . . created a storm when it was published nine years ago...As a veteran of pro-sex feminism who still endorses pornography and prostitution, I say more power to all these chaste young women who are defending their individuality and defying groupthink and social convention. That is true feminism!"--Camille Paglia
"A Return to Modesty provides one invaluable service. There is a growing body of scholarly research on young adulthood that may, in the aftermath of Shalit's booming polemic, be more difficult to ignore."--Emily Eakin "The New York Times Book Review "
"A Return to Modesty is...so uncompromising in voice and stance that one is tempted to think of its author as Simone de Shalit or Wendy Wollstonecraft, but make no mistake: she imitates nothing and no one...Every page of this book [is] wise, fresh, and funny, sparkling with her special brand of astringent charm"--Florence King "National Review "