A Really Good Day: How Microdosing Made a Mega Difference in My Mood, My Marriage, and My Life

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Product Details

Price
$16.95  $15.59
Publisher
Anchor Books
Publish Date
Pages
256
Dimensions
5.2 X 0.7 X 7.9 inches | 0.5 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781101973721
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

AYELET WALDMAN is the author of the novels Love and Treasure, Red Hook Road, Love and Other Impossible Pursuits, and Daughter's Keeper, as well as of the essay collection Bad Mother: A Chronicle of Maternal Crimes, Minor Calamities, and Occasional Moments of Grace, and the Mommy-Track Mystery series. She was a federal public defender and taught at Loyola Law School and the UC Berkeley School of Law, where she developed and taught courses on the legal implications of the war on drugs. She lives in Berkeley, California, with her husband, Michael Chabon, and their four children.

Reviews

"Genuinely brave and human... In normalizing the conversation about LSD, she may one day help others feel normal." --Jennifer Senior, The New York Times

"A wildly brilliant, radically candid, and rigorous daybook of [Waldman's] life-changing, last-resort journey." --Lisa Shea, Elle

"Relentlessly honest and surprisingly funny." --Sharon Peters, USA Today

"An intriguing and thorough look at the therapeutic possibilities of an illegal drug... Engaging and deeply researched." --Nora Krug, The Washington Post

"Smart, outspoken, provoking, and funny... Poignant, sometimes hilarious... Waldman calls for renewed research and drug-law reform in this informative, candid, altogether irresistible quest." --Donna Seaman, Booklist

"Honest and intelligent... A humane, well-reasoned, and absolutely necessary argument for a major overhaul of America's drug policy. The book triumphantly coheres in a lucid manifesto of how and why the racist, immoral undertaking called the War on Drugs has failed... Passionate, persuasive." --Claire Vaye Watkins, The New Republic