A Girl Returned

Available

Product Details

Price
$16.00  $14.72
Publisher
Europa Editions
Publish Date
Pages
160
Dimensions
5.3 X 7.9 X 0.6 inches | 0.45 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781609455286

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About the Author

Donatella Di Pietrantonio lives in Penne where she practices as a pediatric dentist. From the age of nine she has been writing stories, fables, poems, and novels. My Mother Is a River is her first novel. It was first published in Italy in 2011, where it won the Tropea and the John Fante literary prizes, and was translated into German in 2013. Her second book, Bella Mia, was published in 2014 and won the Brancati Prize.

Ann Goldstein is an editor at The New Yorker. Her translations for Europa Editions include novels by Amara Lakhous, Alessandro Piperno, and Elena Ferrante's bestselling My Brilliant Friend. She lives in New York.

Reviews

"Di Pietrantonio [has a] lively way with a phrase (the translator, Ann Goldstein, shows the same sensitivity she does with Elena Ferrante) [and] a fine instinct for detail."--The Washington Post

★ "A gripping, deeply moving coming-of-age novel; immensely readable, beautifully written, and highly recommended."--Kirkus Review (Starred Review)

"Spellbinding."--Publishers Weekly

"A captivating tale about the trials of settling down, fitting in and battling on amid emotional upheaval."--The Economist

"An achingly beautiful book, and an utterly devastating one."--Minneapolis Star Tribune

"Donatella Di Pietrantonio employs sensitive and powerful prose to tell the conflicting coming-of-age story of mothers and daughters, of sisterhood, and of self-discovery."--World Literature Today

"With unflinching perception, in A Girl Returned Di Pietrantonio presents a heartrending tale of a child discarded, never quite reclaimed."--Shelf Awareness

"Set against the rugged landscape of Abruzzo, Italy, A Girl Returned explores the arbitrariness of origin and family relationships, and questions whether we really belong anywhere."--New Statesman