"a"

Louis Zukofsky (Author) Barry Ahearn (Introduction by)
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Description

River that must turn full after I stop dying
Song, my song, raise grief to music
Light as my loves' thought, the few sick
So sick of wrangling: thus weeping,
Sounds of light, stay in her keeping
And my son's face - this much for honor

-- from " 'A'-11"

At long last, here is the whole of Louis Zukofsky's epic masterpiece "A" back in print with misprints corrected and a new, fresh introduction by the noted scholar Barry Ahearn. No other poem in the English language is filled with as much daily love, light, intellect, and music. As William Carlos Williams once wrote of Zukofsky's poetry, "I hear a new music of verse stretching out into the future."

Product Details

Price
$26.95  $24.79
Publisher
New Directions Publishing Corporation
Publish Date
January 31, 2011
Pages
826
Dimensions
6.08 X 1.38 X 8.99 inches | 2.25 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780811218719
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Louis Zukofsky spent forty-sixyears writing his masterwork "A," and died beforehe could see the completed versionpublished. Poet, translator, fictionwriter, essayist, anthologist, critic, teacher, WPA worker, and bindingforce of the Objectivist poets, Zukofsky was born in New York Cityand lived in or near the city hiswhole life.
Barry Ahearn is the Pierce Butler Professor of English at Tulane University. His books include Zukofsky's "A" An Introduction, Pound/Zukofsky: Selected Letters, and The Correspondence of William Carlos Williams and Louis Zukofsky

Reviews

'A' belongs in the company of the major modernist epics such as Pound's Cantos or Williams' Patterson. It will repay as much attention as it is given.--Bob Perelman
Zukofsky's art, in this work, is without equal. No poet of our time can sound the resources of language, so actuate words to become all that they might be thought otherwise to engender.--Robert Creeley
The poem is "of a life," but the life that it presents is closer to life-as-experienced than life as narrated or told. And that, in the final analysis, is precisely the essence of Zukofsky's genius.--Mary Wilson
Magnificent: a great poem really rolling in all its power and splendor of language.--James Laughlin