21 Things You May Not Know about the Indian ACT: Helping Canadians Make Reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples a Reality

Bob Joseph (Author) Sage Isaac (Read by)
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Description

Based on a viral article, 21 Things You May Not Know About the Indian Act is the essential guide to understanding the Canadian legal document and its repercussion on generations of Indigenous peoples, written by a leading cultural sensitivity trainer.

The Indian Act, after 141 years, continues to shape, control, and constrain the lives and opportunities of Indigenous peoples, and is at the root of many lasting stereotypes. Bob Joseph's book comes at a key time in the reconciliation process, when awareness from both Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities is at a crescendo. Joseph explains how Indigenous peoples can step out from under the Indian Act and return to self-government, self-determination, and self-reliance - and why doing so would result in a better country for every Canadian. He dissects the complex issues around truth and reconciliation, and clearly demonstrates why learning about the Indian Act's cruel, enduring legacy is essential for the country to move toward true reconciliation.

Product Details

Price
$19.99  $18.39
Publisher
Audible Studios on Brilliance
Publish Date
August 13, 2019
Dimensions
5.25 X 0.5 X 6.75 inches | 0.0 pounds
Language
English
Type
MP3 CD
EAN/UPC
9781799722540

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About the Author

Bob Joseph, founder of Indigenous Corporate Training Inc., has provided training on Indigenous and Aboriginal relations since 1994. As a certified Master Trainer, Joseph has assisted both individuals and organizations in building Indigenous or Aboriginal relations. His clients include all levels of government, Fortune 500 companies, corporate enterprises, and Indigenous peoples in Canada, U.S., Central 3 and South America, and in the South Pacific. In 2006, Joseph co-facilitated a worldwide Indigenous Peoples' round table in Switzerland, which included participants from across the world. Joseph has also worked in cultural relations and corporate training for many years, and taught at Royal Roads University as an associate professor. Bob Joseph is an Indigenous person, or more specifically a status Indian, and is a member of the Gwawaenuk Nation. The author comes from a proud potlatch family and is an initiated member of the Hamatsa Society. As the son of a hereditary chief, he will one day become a hereditary chief.